The Numerical Bible (7 vols.)

By
Loizeaux Brothers, 1890–1932
Format:

Overview

Many prominent numbers from the Bible—such as 666, 7, 12, 40—have entered the broader cultural consciousness. But what do they mean? And what does the Bible really say about them? In the 7-volume Numerical Bible, Frederick W. Grant surveys the structure and symbolism of Scripture, showing that the Bible is not comprised of piecemeal literary fragments and forgeries, but that its structure and symbolism reflects the careful intentions of divine inspiration.

In The Numerical Bible, Grant shows that the Bible is organized in much the same way as nature. The precision of numbers and the laws of mathematics, which undergirds the order of the universe, also undergirds the order of Scripture. Like the rest of the nature, Scripture exhibits traits of order, structure, and symbol. In fact, the numbers and the very structure of the Bible contain elements of divine revelation.

How do we discern the voice of God in the patterns, structures, and numerical symbols found throughout Scripture? In his attempt to answer this question, Grant’s exploration of numbers in The Numerical Bible launched the modern fascination with biblical symbolism and profoundly influenced the development of dispensational thought. Grant also provides his own translation of the Bible—noteworthy in its own right—along with notes and critical commentary. Notable authors such as Tim LaHaye and Hal Lindsey and famous preachers such as Harry A. Ironside are indebted to Grant’s interpretation of Scripture and his careful analysis of biblical structure and symbolism.

With Logos Bible Software, you’ll encounter Frederick W. Grant like never before! His translation, commentary, and critical notes can be linked to your other Bible translations, commentaries, and encyclopedias and dictionaries. What’s more, the text of The Numerical Bible is fully searchable and easily accessible—perfect for comprehensive study and accurate research. That makes the Logos edition of The Numerical Bible an indispensible tool for studying Grant’s contribution to dispensationalist thought and for understanding the Bible itself.

Key Features

  • Outlines of the structure of each book
  • Complete overview of significant biblical numbers
  • Chapter-by-chapter commentary and critical notes

Product Details

  • Title: The Numerical Bible
  • Author: Frederick W. Grant
  • Publisher: Loizeaux Brothers, Inc.
  • Volumes: 7
  • Pages: 3,801

Individual Titles

Vol. 1: Genesis to Deuteronomy

  • Author: Frederick W. Grant
  • Publisher: Loizeaux Brothers, Inc.
  • Publication Date: 1902
  • Pages: 623

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Grant’s volume on the Pentateuch begins with a comprehensive introduction to the nature and scope of his project. In it, he surveys the relationship between divine revelation and the numerical structure of the Bible. In this volume in particular, Grant explains the significance of the numbers in the Pentateuch—for example, the seven days of creation, the forty days of the flood, the twelve tribes of Israel—and attends to the symbolism of the narrative components in the story. Understanding the numerical structure of the first five books of the Bible constitutes an important first step in biblical interpretation, since the Pentateuch serves as the archetype of the rest of Scripture as much as it predicates God’s intentions for all of human history.

Vol. 2: Joshua to 2 Samuel

  • Author: Frederick W. Grant
  • Publisher: Loizeaux Brothers, Inc.
  • Publication Date: 1902
  • Pages: 489

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In his second volume, Grant contends that the historical books explore the nature of covenant history, yet closely resemble the structure and intent of the Pentateuch. He begins with a sharp challenge against the claims of higher critics, who dispute the historicity and authorship of these books. Instead, Grant argues, the authenticity of these books and their place in the canon affirms the power of God, and much like the Pentateuch, contains elements of a new beginning and a need for obedience. Yet the importance of these books in the biblical canon lies not in their relation to what comes before—the Pentateuch—but to what comes next—God’s punishment and Israel’s captivity. Thus, these books anticipate the dispensational purpose of Israel’s captivity and constitute a new stage in God’s revelation.

Vol. 3: Psalms

  • Author: Frederick W. Grant
  • Publisher: Loizeaux Brothers, Inc.
  • Publication Date: 1902
  • Pages: 640

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Grant first noticed the principle of numerical structure as he studied the book of Psalms—the division into five separate books, the acrostic nature of many Psalms, and similar patterns unique to each Psalm. Though Grant studied the numerical structure of the entire Bible, he began—and constantly returned—to the Psalms, making this volume an important window into the nature and scope of Grant’s interpretive project. In this volume, Grant also connects the numerical structure of the Psalms to the person and work of Christ.

Vol. 4: Ezekiel

  • Author: Frederick W. Grant
  • Publisher: Loizeaux Brothers, Inc.
  • Publication Date: 1902
  • Pages: 339

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In a book famous for its bizarre symbolism, Ezekiel’s visions include bones, beasts, eyes, and wheels. Grant’s unhesitating look at Ezekiel brings the symbolism to the fore. In fact, he concentrates on the very aspects of Ezekiel’s prophecy which often inhibit commentators and discourage readers. He devotes careful attention to the division of the book, the structure of Ezekiel’s visions, the significance of the numbers, and the possibilities for prophetic fulfillment—even into the modern era. This volume also includes a historical chart of the Old Testament prophets, along with illustrations of the temple and a map of the geographic areas mentioned in Ezekiel’s prophecy.

Vol. 5: Matthew to John

  • Author: Frederick W. Grant
  • Publisher: Loizeaux Brothers, Inc.
  • Publication Date: 1902
  • Pages: 625

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Grant’s volume on the Gospels begins with a lengthy introduction to the numerical structure of the New Testament and its role in revealing a new dispensation. Still, despite its differences, the New Testament bears striking similarities to the Old Testament, which are made more poignant by the relationship between the life of Christ and the history of Israel. Grant explains the internal structure the Gospels and their coherence with one another, with a constant eye toward the significance of structures and symbols for interpretation.

Vol. 6: Acts to 2 Corinthians

  • Author: Frederick W. Grant
  • Publisher: Loizeaux Brothers, Inc.
  • Publication Date: 1902
  • Pages: 576

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The middle part of the New Testament chronicles the birth and expansion of the church and includes the stories of Acts and the apostolic epistles. Grant keenly attends to the importance of their structure for interpretation. He explores the scope and the division of each book in the middle part of the New Testament, and contrasts the New Covenant of grace with the Law. In this volume, Grant also introduces Paul’s life and explores the meaning of the order and structure of his letters.

Vol. 7: Hebrews to Revelation

  • Author: Frederick W. Grant
  • Publisher: Loizeaux Brothers, Inc.
  • Publication Date: 1902
  • Pages: 509

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In his final volume, Grant explores the numerical and structural significance of the remaining epistles. He also devotes nearly half the volume to the complex imagery and numerical significance of Revelation, which has eluded commentators for centuries. Grant tackles the book with unreserved analysis of its numbers and symbols—and finds no shortage of either. From the role of the seven churches to the mark of the beast, Grant pushes the limits of his interpretive project to reveal the internal whole of Revelation, which complements the structure of the rest of the Bible.

About Frederick W. Grant

Born in London in 1834, Frederick W. Grant converted to Christianity while reading the Bible. He attended King’s College before traveling to Toronto. At the time, the Church of England was expanding in Canada, and Grant became ordained. He later moved to the United States, and lived in Brooklyn, New York before moving to Plainfield, New Jersey. Grant was also deeply influenced by the teachings of the Plymouth Brethren. Grant died in 1902.

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