Eerdmans Anthony C. Thiselton Collection (4 vols.)

Eerdmans, 2006–2012
Format:

Overview

Hermeneutics is one of theology’s most important fields of study, and this collection offers readers an exploration of both hermeneutical theory and its practical application to Christian theology and biblical interpretation. Arguing that hermeneutics is the “art of understanding,” Anthony Thiselton explains the history of the discipline, its application to Christian thought, and how it can be used profitably for exegesis.

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Key Features

  • Presents a through introduction to the field of hermeneutics
  • Provides insightful commentary on 1 Corinthians
  • Examines the role of hermeneutics in theology

Product Details

Individual Titles

1 Corinthians: A Shorter Exegetical and Pastoral Commentary

  • Author: Anthony C. Thiselton
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 344

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Anthony Thiselton’s lengthy New International Greek Testament Commentary volume The First Epistle to the Corinthians has become a standard work on 1 Corinthians. In this “shorter” commentary, Thiselton draws on his excellent exegesis from that volume but combines it afresh with keen practical and pastoral application for readers at all levels.

Thiselton delves deeply into the context and text of Paul’s first Corinthian letter as he suggests, section by section, how the book applies to pastoral and practical issues. He draws vivid parallels between the growing church in Corinth and the twenty-first-century church, demonstrating that today’s church also faces a seductive culture of competition and consumerism. The church in Corinth preferred its self-centered theology to the Christ-centered gospel of the wider apostolic church. Paul’s response in 1 Corinthians, amplified by Thiselton’s commentary, becomes a living, practical, transforming word from God for Christians today.

Lucidly, accessibly, and engagingly, Thiselton brings alive the subject matter about which St. Paul writes. Thus, this commentary searchingly illuminates the nature of Christian lifestyle and spirituality today.

—Walter Moberly, professor of theology and religion, Durham University

In his 1400-page NIGTC volume on 1 Corinthians, Anthony Thiselton explained that he addressed every legitimate question he could think of that someone might ask of the text! The result was a masterpiece, but one that few readers will ever fully scrutinize. In a new labor of love, Thiselton has now created this marvelous digest, at the same time interacting with the newest round of research, adding applicational gems into his exegesis, and inserting thoughtful questions for reflection and implementation at the end of each section. This will immediately become the main text for my English Bible 1 Corinthians elective.

Craig L. Blomberg, professor of New Testament, Denver Seminary

This commentary provides a good model of exegetical and pastoral writing and is well worth having on the shelf of anyone working in ministry.

Review of Biblical Literature

Hermeneutics: An Introduction

  • Author: Anthony C. Thiselton
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 424

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Anthony Thiselton here brings together his encyclopedic knowledge of hermeneutics and his nearly four decades of teaching on the subject to provide a splendid interdisciplinary textbook. After a thorough historical overview of hermeneutics, Thiselton moves into modern times with extensive analysis of scholarship from the mid-twentieth century, including liberation and feminist theologies, reader-response and reception theory, and postmodernism. No other text on hermeneutics covers the range of writers and subjects discussed in Thiselton’s Hermeneutics.

Hermeneutics, although now recognized to be indispensable to biblical and theological study, has hitherto lacked an introductory textbook that is simultaneously lucid, comprehensive, and authoritative. This, at last, is it.

—Walter Moberly, professor of theology and religion, Durham University

This is that rare book that is simply a pleasure to read. An ideal textbook, it is provocative, wise, astonishingly informed, and scrupulously evenhanded in its handling of material. Elephants may swim here and children may safely paddle. It is truly Tony Thiselton’s legacy and the uncluttered distillation of a lifetime’s study of hermeneutics. I cannot praise this book sufficiently highly.

Iain Torrance, president, Princeton Theological Seminary

The Hermeneutics of Doctrine

  • Author: Anthony C. Thiselton
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 671

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Drawing on the resources of contemporary hermeneutical theory, Anthony Thiselton in this volume masterfully recovers the formative and transformative power of Christian doctrine.

The past 35 years have witnessed major steps forward in the use of hermeneutics in biblical studies, but never before has hermeneutics made a comparable impact on the formulation of doctrine and our engagement with it. Indeed, no other book explores the interface between hermeneutics and Christian doctrine in the same in-depth way that this one does. Throughout the book Thiselton shows how perspectives that arise from hermeneutics shed fresh light on theological method, reshape horizons of understanding, and reveal the relevance of doctrine for formation and for life.

Arguably the leading authority worldwide on biblical and philosophical hermeneutics, Thiselton has written widely acclaimed works in the areas of biblical studies and philosophical theology. His probing interaction in The Hermeneutics of Doctrine with numerous other great thinkers—Gadamer, Ricoeur, Lindbeck, Balthasar,Vanhoozer, Pannenberg—and his original perspectives will make this volume a valuable resource for scholars and advanced students.

Anthony Thiselton is undoubtedly one of the most sophisticated and creative minds in the whole of the Anglican Communion today, equally respected as a biblical scholar and as an expert guide to theories of interpretation. In this magisterial work he brings his two areas of expertise together more extensively than ever before in a great systematic essay on the central importance of doctrine and its roots in the practice of intelligent reading of Scripture. The Hermeneutics of Doctrine is by any standard a major work, deeply necessary in a climate where confusion and indifference about doctrine too often prevail.

Rowan Williams, archbishop of Canterbury

This is a patient, profound, searching, and intellectually honest book, much like its author. As a scholar steeped in hermeneutical theory, Thiselton here turns his attention to Christian doctrine, which so often is marginalized as mere theory. He draws compellingly on Gadamer: ‘Hermeneutics is above all a practice . . . In it what one has to exercise above all is the ear . . .’ Hermeneutical reflection, Thiselton reminds us, is formative. This in turn involves transformation because it involves keeping oneself open to what is the other. In a sustained argument, Thiselton here explores ‘what the ‘otherness’ of the doctrinal subject matter demands as a horizon within which its claims will be heard without distortion.’

Iain Torrance, president, Princeton Theological Seminary

All the adjectives have already been used up in praise of Tony Thiselton’s previous volumes: magisterial, comprehensive, mind-blowing, worldview-changing, challenging yet comprehensible, massively learned and massively relevant, deeply faithful to the Christian tradition yet deeply refreshing in seeing everything from new angles. This new book is vintage Thiselton.

N.T. Wright, professor of New Testament and early Christianity, St. Andrews University

Life after Death: A New Approach to the Last Things

  • Author: Anthony C. Thiselton
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 269

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Writing in the wake of a near-fatal stroke, eminent theologian Anthony C. Thiselton addresses a universally significant topic: death and what comes next. This distinctive study of “the last things” comprehensively explores questions about individual death, the intermediate state, the return of Christ, the resurrection of the dead, hell, the final state of the redeemed, and more. At once scholarly and pastoral, Thiselton’s Life after Death offers biblically astute, historically informed, and intellectually sound answers—making this book an invaluable resource for thinking Christians.

Very accessible, deeply grounded in Scripture, pastorally helpful, and sensitive to that most democratic of all institutions—death. What a real gem of a book.

—John Sentamu, archbishop of York

With his characteristically firm grasp of sources ancient and contemporary and with admirable clarity, Anthony Thiselton guides the reader through the complexities of such vexed biblical themes as hell, the final judgment, the return of Christ, and the resurrection of the dead—giving us a book that is not only theologically profound but also pastorally encouraging.

Thomas G. Long, author, Accompany Them with Singing

Thiselton draws on a lifetime’s study of Scripture, doctrine, philosophy, and the nature of language to construct a Christian theology of the last things. Immensely learned and rich in Christian wisdom, this book has much to offer all students of the Christian faith.

John Webster, chair of divinity, St. Mary’s College, University of St. Andrews

About Anthony C. Thiselton

Anthony C. Thiselton is professor emeritus of Christian theology at the University of Nottingham, England.