Neglected Factors in the Study of the Early Progress of Christianity

Hodder and Stoughton, 1899
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Overview

Neglected Factors in the Study of the Early Progress of Christianity contains three lectures originally delivered in 1897 at the Theological Seminary of Auburn, New York. James Orr shows that the influence of early Christianity upon its pagan environment was much larger than is often supposed. Lectures include:

  • The Extension of Christianity Laterally or Numerically in the Roman Empire
  • The Extension of Christianity Vertically, or as Respects the Different Strata of Society
  • The Intensive or Penetrative Influence of Christianity on the Thought and Life of the Empire

Praise for the Print Edition

Is a valuable contribution to the history of the subject.

Scotsman

These lectures are able, learned, and they show that Dr. Orr has the gift of research, and of looking at things for himself.

Aberdeen Free Press

Dr. Orr’s lectures are eminently instructive and interesting, and certainly go to intensify the sense of the mighty power which Christianity, from its first entrance into the world, exercised in everything it touched.

Church Family Newspaper

Product Details

  • Title: Neglected Factors in the Study of the Early Progress of Christianity
  • Author: James Orr
  • Publisher: Hodder and Stoughton
  • Publication Date: 1899
  • Pages: 235

About James Orr

James Orr (1844–1913) was minister of the East Bank United Presbyterian Church in Hawick, Scotland, from 1874–1891, and professor of church history in the Theological College of the United Presbyterian Church of Scotland from 1874–1901. From 1901, he was professor of apologetics and theology at Glasgow College of the United Free Church. He was among the chief promoters for the union between the Free and United Presbyterian Churches in Scotland. He lectured at seminaries all over the world and was a prolific writer and editor.

Orr served as the editor for the International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, 1915 Edition, contributed four volumes to the The Pulpit Commentary, and is featured in The Fundamentals (4 vols.).

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