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Mobile Ed: Text of the Bible Bundle (4 courses)

By 3 authors ,
,
/ Lexham Press / 2014–2016

Runs on Windows, Mac, and mobile.

$399.99

 

Overview

Find out how we got the Bible, from ancient manuscript to modern translation, with this bundle featuring several of today’s leading biblical scholars. Dr. Craig Evans—world-renowned professor and archaeologist—responds to skeptics with a persuasive defense of the reliability of New Testament manuscripts. Dr. Michael Heiser, an expert in a dozen ancient languages, explains how the Old and New Testaments were composed, copied, and canonized. Dr. Mark Strauss—vice chair for the Committee of Bible Translation—surveys the issues in Bible translation so you can understand how and why translations disagree. Gain a deeper appreciation for the text of the Bible from these scholars who have spent more than a combined 75 years in the field.

Individual Courses

BI181 Introducing Bible Translations

  • Instructor: Mark L. Strauss
  • Video hours: 2

Bible translation expert Dr. Mark Strauss introduces the philosophies of translation in order to equip students in their selection of a specific version (or versions) of the Bible. Dr. Strauss compares functional and formal equivalence and describes the strengths and weaknesses of each. He discusses elements of language such as gender terminology, idioms, and metaphors to reveal the importance of this often-overlooked but fundamental part of preaching, teaching, and personal Bible study.

Contents:

  • Introduction to Bible Translation
  • Translation Processes
  • Translation Philosophies

Dr. Mark L. Strauss is professor of New Testament at Bethel Seminary in San Diego and vice-chair of the NIV Committee on Bible Translation. He has written several books, including The Davidic Messiah in Luke-Acts, The Challenge of Bible Translation and Gender Accuracy, and Luke in the Zondervan Illustrated Bible Background Commentary series.

OT281 How We Got the Old Testament

  • Instructor: Michael S. Heiser
  • Video hours: 5

In this course, ancient-language expert Dr. Michael Heiser gives a thorough background of the Hebrew Bible’s writing, composition, canonicity, and transmission through the ages. This course also surveys text criticism—what are Hebrew scholars today doing with these ancient manuscripts? How does their work affect English translations of the Bible? By understanding criticism, your personal Bible study will be richer, even with little knowledge of the Hebrew language.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Preliminary Issues
  • What Is the New Testament?
  • The Term “New Testament”
  • Exploring “Covenant” Using the Topic Guide
  • The Scope of the New Testament
  • Number of New Testament Books
  • Order and Structure of New Testament Books
  • Titles of New Testament Books
  • The Authority of the Testaments
  • Creating a Custom Guide to Study 2 Timothy 3:16
  • Road Map for this Course
Unit 2: Inspiration
  • Two Sides to Inspiration
  • Flawed Conception of Inspiration
  • Coherent Conception: Major Verses
  • Coherent Conception: Textual Phenomena
Unit 3: The Composition of the New Testament Books
  • Preview
  • Researching Important Dates with the Timeline Tool
  • The Language of the New Testament
  • Defining “Autograph”
  • Producing Documents in a Graeco-Roman World
  • Understanding Technical Terms
  • Amanuenses
  • Use of External Source Material
  • Exploring Ancient Texts Relevant to the Text of the New Testament
  • Literary Intent and Occasion
Unit 4: Canonical Recognition of the New Testament Books
  • Concept of Canon
  • Early Development
  • The Impact of Canon on Copying and Transmission
Unit 5: Manuscripts of the New Testament
  • The Copying Enterprise
  • The Innovation of the Codex
  • Manuscript Types and Discoveries
  • Papyri
  • Uncials and Sinaiticus
  • Using Textual Apparatuses in Logos
  • Uncials: Alexandrinus
  • Viewing Codex Sinaiticus in Logos
  • Uncials: Vaticanus
  • Uncials: Codex Bezae
  • Minuscules
  • Lectionaries
  • Quotations from the Fathers
  • Searching for New Testament Citations in the Early Church Fathers
  • Early Versions of the New Testament
  • Archaeological Factors in Dating Manuscripts
  • Dating and the Forms of Manuscripts
  • Dating and Paleography
  • Carbon-14 Dating
  • Manuscript Families
  • Alexandrian Family
  • Byzantine Family
Unit 6: The History of the Text’s Transmission
  • The Early Centuries (1st–4th)
  • The Byzantine Era (400–1516)
  • The “Received Text” (1516–1633)
  • Erasmus’ First Edition (1516)
  • Erasmus’ First and Third Editions
  • Later Editions of Erasmus’ Text
  • The Period of Critical Research (1633–1881)
  • Important Scholarly Work
  • Westcott and Hort
  • Positive Reaction to Westcott and Hort
  • Negative Reaction to Westcott and Hort
  • H. von Soden’s Text (1913)
  • Eberhard Nestle (1898–1963)
  • UBS First Edition
  • UBS Third Edition and Nestle-Aland Edition
  • Modern Majority Text Editions
  • SBL Greek New Testament
  • Comparing Major Editions of the Greek New Testament
Unit 7: The Impact of Textual History
  • Pre-20th Century
  • Evaluating Modern Translations
  • The American Standard Version
  • The Revised Standard Version
  • The New American Standard Bible
  • The New International Version
  • The New King James Version
  • The New Revised Standard Version
  • The New English Translation
  • The English Standard Version
Unit 8: Textual Criticism of the New Testament
  • Preview of the Process
  • Determining Variants
  • Gathering Evidence: The Specialist
  • Gathering Evidence: The Nonspecialist
  • Using Digital Tools for Conducting Text-Critical Research
  • Evaluating Evidence: Types of Variants
  • Unintentional Variants: Word Division
  • Unintentional Variants: Letter Confusion
  • Unintentional Variants: Eye Skipping
  • Unintentional Variants: Haplography
  • Unintentional Variants: Dittography
  • Unintentional Variants: Transposition
  • Unintentional Variants: Faulty Hearing
  • Intentional Variants: Clarifying the Text
  • Intentional Variants: Conflation
  • Intentional Variants: Harmonization and Smoothing
  • Evaluating Variants
  • Evaluating Variants: Internal Considerations
  • Evaluating Variants: External Considerations
  • Evaluating Variants: Logical Considerations
  • Investigating the “Johannine Comma” with Various Tools
  • Textual Criticism, Inspiration, and Inerrancy
Unit 9: The “King James Only” Controversy
  • Preview of the Issue
  • The Merit Argument
  • The Providence Argument
  • The Satanic Argument
  • The Heresy Argument
  • A Personal Note
Conclusion
  • Course Summary

Dr. Michael S. Heiser is the academic editor for Logos Bible Software, Bible Study Magazine, and the Faithlife Study Bible. He is the coeditor of Old Testament Greek Pseudepigrapha with Morphology and Semitic Inscriptions: Analyzed Texts and English Translations and can do translation work in roughly a dozen ancient languages. He earned his PhD in Hebrew Bible and Semitic languages and holds and MA in ancient history and Hebrew studies. In addition, he was named the 2007 Pacific Northwest Regional Scholar by the Society of Biblical Literature.

NT281 How We Got the New Testament

  • Instructor: Michael S. Heiser
  • Video hours: 4

In this course, Dr. Michael Heiser explains the story of how we got the New Testament—he guides you from the process of inspiration to the discovery and transmission of manuscripts. Dr. Heiser describes the role of scribes throughout time and discusses significant Greek New Testament manuscripts upon which modern translations are based. Because most students of the Bible read it in their own language, he also examines translation philosophies and controversies.

Contents:

  • Preliminary Issues
  • Inspiration
  • The Composition of the New Testament Books
  • Canonical Recognition of the New Testament Books
  • Manuscripts of the New Testament
  • The History of the Text’s Transmission
  • The Impact of Textual History
  • Textual Criticism of the New Testament
  • The “King James Only” Controversy

Dr. Michael S. Heiser is the academic editor for Logos Bible Software, Bible Study Magazine, and the Faithlife Study Bible. He is the coeditor of Old Testament Greek Pseudepigrapha with Morphology and Semitic Inscriptions: Analyzed Texts and English Translations and can do translation work in roughly a dozen ancient languages. He earned his PhD in Hebrew Bible and Semitic languages and holds and MA in ancient history and Hebrew studies. In addition, he was named the 2007 Pacific Northwest Regional Scholar by the Society of Biblical Literature.

NT308 The Reliability of New Testament Manuscripts

  • Instructor: Craig A. Evans
  • Video hours: 1

In this course, distinguished scholar Dr. Craig Evans answers a question commonly asked about the New Testament—can we trust the manuscripts? Because the answer has serious consequences, Dr. Evans clearly outlines the history of these important documents. He discusses the quality, quantity, and age of the manuscripts and how these elements compare to nonbiblical ancient texts. Numerous text examples as well as descriptions of the practices of ancient writers and scribes also contribute to his argument for reliable manuscripts.

Contnets:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Evidence for the Reliability of New Testament Manuscripts
  • The Basics of New Testament Manuscripts
  • Finding Manuscripts in Logos
  • Examples Demonstrating the Quality of New Testament Manuscripts
  • Adding Manuscript Images to Presentations or Documents
  • Exploring Ancient Manuscripts and Resources
  • The Comparative Strength of the New Testament Manuscript Record
  • The Longevity of the Autographs
  • Researching the Works of Tertullian
  • The Number of Autographs
  • Accessing and Navigating the Textual Apparatus
  • The Preservation of the New Testament in Translations

Dr. Craig A. Evans received his PhD in New Testament from Claremont Graduate University and his DHabil from the Karoli Gaspar Reformed University in Budapest. He is the John Bisagno Distinguished Professor of Christian Origins at Houston Baptist University in Texas.

Evans taught at Trinity Western University in British Columbia for 21 years, where he directed the graduate program in biblical studies and founded the Dead Sea Scrolls Institute. He has recently served on the advisory board for the Gospel of Judas for National Geographic Society and has appeared frequently as an expert commentator on network television programs.

Evans has written and edited extensively on the historical Jesus and the Jewish background of the New Testament era. His published works include From Prophecy to Testament, Jesus and the Ossuaries, Jesus: The Final Days, and Dictionary of New Testament Background.

Product Details

Getting the most out of Mobile Ed

Logos Mobile Education is a highly effective cross-platform learning environment that integrates world class teaching with the powerful study tools and theological libraries available in Logos Bible Software. Every course provides links to additional resources and suggested readings that supplement the lecture material at the end of every transcript segment.